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Wednesday, May 6, 2020 | History

5 edition of Effects of land-use change on atmospheric C0₂ concentrations found in the catalog.

Effects of land-use change on atmospheric C0₂ concentrations

Effects of land-use change on atmospheric C0₂ concentrations

South and Southeast Asia as a case study

  • 180 Want to read
  • 26 Currently reading

Published by Springer-Verlag in New York .
Written in English

    Places:
  • South Asia.,
  • Asia, Southeastern.
    • Subjects:
    • Atmospheric carbon dioxide -- South Asia,
    • Atmospheric carbon dioxide -- Asia, Southeastern,
    • Land use -- Environmental aspects -- South Asia,
    • Land use -- Environmental aspects -- Asia, Southeastern,
    • Forest biomass -- Environmental aspects -- South Asia,
    • Forest biomass -- Environmental aspects -- Asia, Southeastern

    • Edition Notes

      Includes bibliographical references and index.

      StatementVirginia H. Dale, editor.
      SeriesEcological studies ;, vol. 101, Ecological studies ;, v. 101.
      ContributionsDale, Virginia H.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsQC879.8 .E25 1994
      The Physical Object
      Paginationx, 384 p. :
      Number of Pages384
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL1397619M
      ISBN 100387941177, 3540941177
      LC Control Number93005145

      Air pollution is one of the key environmental problems associated with urbanization and land use. Taking Wuhan city, Central China, as a case example, we explore the quantitative relationship between land use (built-up land, water bodies, and vegetation) and air quality (SO2, NO2, and PM10) based on nine ground-level monitoring sites from a long-term spatio-temporal perspective in –   Introduction. Climate change, caused in part by increased atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO 2) and other greenhouse gases, is likely to result in increases in temperature and humidity, changes in the amount, distribution, and intensity of precipitation events, and increases in the intensity and frequency of certain extreme weather events (Solomon et al., ).

      Effects of Changing the Carbon Cycle. All of this extra carbon needs to go somewhere. So far, land plants and the ocean have taken up about 55 percent of the extra carbon people have put into the atmosphere while about 45 percent has stayed in the atmosphere. Purchase Climate Change, Air Pollution and Global Challenges, Volume 13 - 1st Edition. Print Book & E-Book. ISBN ,

      With an understanding of the history and dynamics of the biosphere, the authors address the future role of atmospheric CO2 and its likely effects on ecosystems. This book incorporates the advances of various earth science, environmental, and ecological fields into an overall account of global change and the changing dynamics of life on cturer: Springer. and land use change associated with industrial tempt to discuss the effects of the rise in atmo- have consistently shown that this increase and/or population expansion (Houghton et al., spheric CO 2 concentration on plant growth and varies for plants with a C 3 (33% to 40% in­ ).


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Effects of land-use change on atmospheric C0₂ concentrations Download PDF EPUB FB2

Sources and sinks of CO associated with land use can be 2 significant determinants of the rate and magnitude of atmospheric CO change. 2 Combustion of fossil fuels and the deforestation associated with land-use change both contribute CO to the atmosphere; in contrast, biological processes on land create 2 potential sinks for the excess CO.

Effects of Land-Use Change on Atmospheric CO2 Concentrations: South and Southeast Asia as a Case Study (Ecological Studies) [H.

Dale, Virginia, Dale, Virginia H.] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying by: Effects of land-use change on atmospheric C0₂ concentrations: South and Southeast Asia as a case study.

caused by tropical land-use change is the biomass density (biomass per unit area) of the forests undergoing change (Brown et al. ; Dale et al. The biomass density of forests being cleared and burned influences the potential amount of carbon that can enter the atmosphere.

The principal reasons for the uncertainty are that many modelsCited by: Determining how land-use change effects atmospheric CO 2 concentrations requires new approaches to research because of the large area and the long period of time involved.

This special issue of the Canadian Journal of Forest Research presents a. The major change in land use in progress in Borneo is from rainforest to oil palm, and to study the effects of these changes, an additional set of measurements over oil palm (H 2 O, CO 2, VOCs, O 3, aerosols) were made.

The primary papers reporting the measurements are provided by Misztal et al. and Whitehead et al. This paper provides an. Estimating the effects of land-use change on global atmospheric CO2 concentrations Article (PDF Available) in Canadian Journal of Forest Research 21(1) February with 65 Reads.

land use changes on atmospheric chemistry depends on a consistent representation of emissions, deposition, and canopy interactions and their dependence on meteorological, hydrological, and biological drivers to account for these compensating effects.

Future land use change (LUC) is an important component of the IPCC representative concentration pathways (RCPs), but in these scenarios' radiative forcing targets the climate impact of LUC only includes greenhouse gases. However, climate effects due to physical changes of.

R h increases in response to the combined effects of changes in climate, atmospheric CO 2 concentrations, and land‐use, even though soil carbon stocks decrease under the A2 scenarios.

This is due to rising temperatures and increased input of slash wood into the litter pool. To isolate the effect of land-use changes on climate, several CMIP5 modeling groups performed additional LUCID–CMIP5 simulations without anthropogenic land-use changes from to The differences between simulations with and without land-use changes reveal climatic effects of LULCC on global and regional scales.

Few studies have addressed the effects of changing climate or land use/land cover on atmospheric mercury. Lei et al. () found that the benefits from reductions in the domestic United States mercury emissions for the – period would be largely offset by rising anthropogenic emissions overseas and rising natural emissions.

The methodology has been applied to changes in land-use from grasslands to forest for a case study area in Spain. An albedo accounting model was first used to calculate top of the atmosphere albedo effects caused by an assumed land use change.

In a second. Global changes in land use, such as tropical deforestation, may therefore lead to significant changes in weather patterns and changes in the chemistry of the atmosphere -. climate, land use, and CO 2 concentrations.

Although land use change was the major control on the carbon inventory of Europe over the last years, the current state of the terrestrial biosphere is largely controlled by land use change during the past century. Between andclimate variability led to temporary sequestration events of.

It has long been recognized that pollution emissions can affect air quality beyond national borders. For instance, field studies have shown that the prevailing westerly winds typically carry ozone and its precursors from the eastern United States into Canada, the North Atlantic, and beyond (e.g.

Today, CO 2 concentrations in the atmosphere are increasing as a direct result of human activities such as deforestation and the burning of fossil fuels (e.g., coal and oil). Over the past years, CO 2 concentrations in the atmosphere have increased by as much as 30 percent (from to ppm).

Land use and land use changes can significantly contribute to overall climate change. Vegetation and soils typically act as a carbon sink, storing carbon dioxide that is absorbed through the land is disturbed, the stored carbon dioxide—along with methane and nitrous oxide—is emitted, re-entering the atmosphere.

atmospheric concentrations of these gases have b een. e rest is predominantly due to land-use. While humanity is still being plagued by climate change effects, RS and GIS play a crucial.

In addition, the reanalyses do not include effects of the changing atmospheric composition on radiation, despite carbon dioxide concentrations in the atmosphere. Global warming - Global warming - Land-use change: There are a number of ways in which changes in land use can influence climate.

The most direct influence is through the alteration of Earth’s albedo, or surface reflectance. For example, the replacement of forest by cropland and pasture in the middle latitudes over the past several centuries has led to an increase in albedo, which in turn.Effects of land-use change on atmospheric CO2 concentrations: South and Southeast Asia as a case study.Ammonium concentrations in many soils have increased in recent years as a result of land-use changes and increases in ammonium concentration in precipitation14,